Wicklog 19: Level editor & ghost bugs.

First, quick note: while asking around the edu tech community about how to proceed with CL, I met Mikael Uusi-Mäkelä, one of the people responsible for MinecraftEdu, and he asked if I wanted to write a guest post for the TeacherGaming blog. I wrote about the process that led me to convert my lab-based neuroscience into the game mechanics of Crescent Loom, which you can now read here.

Level Editor

The most consistent feedback I’ve gotten on Crescent Loom is that it’s difficult to figure out how to get started. I limited the scope of the Kickstarter campaign to *just* making the game engine in order to ensure that I’d be able to deliver on-time, but this meant that I had almost no room to smooth out the learning curve. I still managed to make a basic get-started tutorial (voice-acted, no less!) but it’s short and only scratches the surface of what’s possible.

So: between my time looking for jobs/funding, I’ve started poking at how to make a more comprehensive tutorial that teaches skills in smaller chunks. My first stab at this — setting up a level so the player just had to connect a pacemaker to a muscle in order to get a pre-made creature to move — instantly hit a brick wall. I didn’t have the tools to set up such a specific scenario. Y’see, up til this point, I’ve been setting up maps purely via script, like so:

I had to manually set the position and size of rooms, and the procedural generation meant that I had very little control over what they actually looked like. In order to make levels with defined goals, I needed to be able to place creatures, objectives, and obstacles. I needed a level editor.

In line with the principle of “do the minimum required work”, I first thought about trying to set up a system where I could make levels in some other software. For instance, I’ve had luck before using a spreadsheet as a map editor, which would look something like this:

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Communities I reached out to for Crescent Loom

(at least some of them, for future reference)

Reed College // Portland friends via Facebook

Game devs (more advice than direct financial support)

Scientists / Popsci

“Gamers”

By Wick Perry | © 2018 Wickworks
Proud to be a member of PIGsquad and Playful Oasis.